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MUST KNOW FACTS

Facts you must know before you buy a puppy.

1. Make sure that both parents are registered with either the Kennel Union of South Africa (KUSA) or the National Field Trial Association (NFTA).

These are the only two bodies officially recognised nationally and internationally by the International Dog Association (FCI). GSPs not registered with these two organisation origins might be questionable and they will be not allowed to compete in either Conformation shows or Field Trials.

2. If you want a working GSP, make sure that both parents have passed the Natural Ability Test and/or have won prizes at the Field Trials.

These are the only officially recognised tests for working GSPs in South Africa. If the parents have not passed these tests, they are probably not from working stock no matter how good a story the breeder tells you. Do not fall for any excuses such as that they are hunting dogs and not field trial dogs, or that they have hunted with xy and z, or that the club and its officials are this and that.

3. Our Club has a record of each and every registered and working GSP in South Africa.

If you have any queries do not hesitate to contact us. Before you buy that puppy make sure that both parents comply with the minimum standard set in South Africa.

4. Be wary of breeders who criticize the recognised field trial clubs and their officials. That is often their only recourse to hiding their own dog's flaws.

5. Also, be wary of breeders who claim that they have hunting dogs and not field trial dogs, they are often demonstrating their ignorance of Field Trials, dog genetics or again trying to hide their dog's flaws. Field Trials are merely competitions to determine the top hunting dogs.

Remember that those characteristics you admire so much in your dog have come about through careful objective selection through Field Trials and other tests, and invariably it is from these dogs that the best hunting dogs are bred.

6. Never buy two pups of the same age. This is a sure recipe for disaster. Be wary of breeders who try to sell two pups to you at the same time.

The pups bond to each other and not to you and in nearly all cases result in an unruly mini dog pack which is a recipe for disaster. First, train one pup before you get a second one.
 

7. Remember that good dogs do not need to be advertised. Rather get on the clubs waiting lists than fall for glamorous adverts.

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